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Vitamin B1(Thiamin) deficiency

Why we need Thiamin

Thiamin helps regulate nerve growth, stimulates brain action, and memory. Helps convert food to energy. It required for nerve and muscle function, enzyme reactions, and fatty acid production.

Thiamin also keeps our brain and nervous system fueled up. Human brain runs on glucose, a type of sugar that’s made from the carbohydrates you eat. Thiamin helps our brain and nervous system absorb enough glucose. Without it, they take in only half of what they really need.

And when your brain doesn’t get enough fuel, you start to get forgetful, depressed, tired, and apathetic.
Thiamin also helps keep heart muscles elastic and working smoothly, which help heart pumping strongly and evenly, with just the right number of beats.

Vitamin B1 is indispensable for the health of the entire nervous system; prevents fatigue and increases stamina; prevents edema and fluid retention, also aids in digestion and metabolism.

Causes of Vitamin B1 (Thiamin) deficiency and symptoms

Vitamin B1 deficiency can result from inadequate food intake.
Deficiency causes beriberi, a disease that affects cardiovascular, nervous, muscular, and gastrointestinal systems.

Thiamin deficiency is common among alcoholics, who often have inadequate food intakes. Alcohol provides energy without providing many of the necessary nutrients. Alcohol also impairs the absorption of thiamin, while increasing excretion of thiamin.
Extreme thiamin deficiency can lead to an enlarged heart, weight loss, muscular weakness, poor short-term memory, and cardiac failure.

Some people are at high risk of Vitamin B1 deficiency: elderly who don’t eat well and don’t get enough thiamin in their diets; pregnant or breastfeeding women; diabetics.

How to avoid Vitamin B2 deficiency

But in fact most people, even the ones with the health issues listed here, do get enough thiamin. A real deficiency is pretty rate.

Wheat germ, liver, pork, whole & enriched grains, dried beans
Good sources of thiamin are pork, liver, fish, oranges, peas, peanut butter, wheat germ, beans, and whole grains.

Enzymes present in raw fish and shellfish destroy thiamin. Also, tannins in tea and coffee can oxidize thiamin, reducing the availability of thiamin in the diet.


Over the counter medications for common health problems

Fabulous Power of Vitamins and Minerals

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