Hyponatremia or Sodium deficiency

Solution of salt in water

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Why we need Sodium?

Salt is essential for life. Salt is contained from sodium and chloride.
Most people enjoy the taste enhancing flavor of salt. Less than 10 percent of salt intake is from the salt in unprocessed foods such as fruits and vegetables. Three-quarters of the salt most people eat is hidden in processed foods. Many processed foods have high sodium content without tasting salty. One teaspoon of salt weighs about five grams, and contains 2000 mg sodium
(40 percent sodium).

What causes sodium deficiency

Sodium deficiency does not normally result from inadequate dietary intakes. Most of us get plenty of salt from our food (or even too much) and don’t need extra even in very hot weather or when we’re sweating a lot.

In rare cases, excessive water intake can cause low sodium levels in the blood.

Sodium deficiency is called hyponatremia. Hyponatremia can be caused by prolonged, excessive sweating, prolonged vomiting or diarrhea, or the use of some diuretics. It is quite serious to deprive the body of sodium.
Hyponatremia is something to watch for with intense sport competitions that last for many hours.

Certain drugs can cause lowered sodium levels. These drugs include some diuretics, ibuprofen, naproxen, Prozac, and Elavil.

Severe hyponatremia can be fatal. It causes an imbalance of electrolytes that are essential for transporting water through the body as well as regulates nerves and major organs.

Hyponatremia symptoms

One of the primary symptoms of hyponatremia (sodium deficiency) is weakness: especially muscular weakness. Your body is aching, and all of a sudden you can not accomplish the athletic feats you used to be able to.

Other symptoms of hyponatremia include headache, muscle cramps, fainting, fatigue, and disorientation.

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