Vitamin B6 Linked to Lower Lung Cancer Risk

Having higher blood levels of vitamin B6 and the amino acid methionine both appear to reduce lung cancer risk in smokers and nonsmokers alike, regular to a new study.

“We found that vitamin B6 and methionine are strongly associated with reducing lung cancer risk in people who never smoked, those who quit, and current smokers,” researcher Paul Brennan, PhD, of the International Agency for Research on Cancer in Lyon, France, tells WebMD.

Whether the link is cause and effect, he says, is not known.

In the U.S. alone, more than 219,000 new cases of lung cancer were expected in 2009, regular to the American Cancer Society, with about 160,000 deaths.

The study, funded by the World Cancer Research Fund and others, is published in The Journal of the American Medical Association.

Vitamin B6 and Lung Cancer Risk: Study Details

Brennan and colleagues evaluated levels of B6 and methionine in blood samples from participants in the large European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study, which enrolled more than 519,000 participants from 10 European countries between 1992 and 2000.

His team zeroed in on 899 lung cancer cases and compared them to a group of 1,770 healthy comparison-group participants, matched to the lung cancer patients by country, sex, date of birth, and when the blood was collected.

They classified the participants into four groups, depending on blood levels of vitamin B6, which helps the body break down protein, maintain red blood cells, and perform other bodily functions, and methionine, which is involved in B vitamin metabolism.

After accounting for smoking, Brennan and colleagues found that the higher the vitamin B6 and methionine, the lower the lung cancer risk.

People in the highest group for vitamin B levels had a 56% reduced lung cancer risk, compared to those in the lowest group. Those with the highest methionine levels had a 48% reduced lung cancer risk, the researchers found.

“That’s quite a strong effect,” Brennan says, but emphasizes that more study is needed.

Some previous research, he says, looked only at smokers and linked vitamin B6 to a reduced lung cancer risk. His study, by including never smokers and past smokers, expands the information about the link.

Vitamin B6 is found in beans, grains, meat, poultry, fish, and some fruits and vegetables. Methionine is found in animal protein, some nuts, and vegetable seeds.

Vitamin B6, Methionine, and Lung Cancer: Behind the Results

How to make clear the link is not known, the researchers say. But deficiencies in vitamin B6, for instance, may raise the risk of DNA damage and gene mutations, fostering cancer development.

Methionine is involved in a complex metabolism process with B vitamins.

Brennan cautions that the results are not a message to self-prescribe vitamin supplements. And the main message remains that people who smoke should quit, since it’s the main risk factor for lung cancer, says Brennan.

Vitamin B6, Methionine, and Lung Cancer: Second View

The new study appears to be carefully done, with “intriguing” discoverings, says Michael J. Thun, MD, vice president emeritus of epidemiology and surveillance research for the American Cancer Society. “However,” he adds, “research on vitamins for cancer prevention has been fraught with many disappointments.”

“It is therefore unwise to leap to premature conclusions.” Like Brennan, Thun says the next step is to repeat the discoverings in another population.

“These discoverings should not be interpreted as evidence that smokers can substitute taking vitamin B6 for stopping smoking, nor as encouragement to take very high doses of vitamin B6, since this can have toxic effects on the skin and nervous system,” Thun says.

He cautions people not to exceed the advisable dietary allowance of vitamin B6. Adults below age 50 need 1.3 milligrams a day, about the amount found in two medium bananas.

SOURCES: Paul Brennan, PhD, International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France.

Johansson, M. Journal of the American Medical Association, June 16, 2010; vol 303: pp 2377-2385.

Michael J. Thun, MD, vice president emeritus, epidemiology & surveillance research, American Cancer Society.

American Cancer Society.

National Institutes of Health Office of dietary Supplements: “dietary Supplement Fact Sheet: Vitamin B6.”

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Role of vitamins on kidney stones formation

Vitamin B6 benefits in kidney stones treatment

The vast majority of kidney stone sufferers also lack complex vitamin B. So when you go to get distilled water, then get some supplementary vitamin B as well.
Studies have proved the significant therapeutic success of vitamin B6 or pyridoxine in the treatment of kidney Stones.

Vitamin B6 helps prevent calcium oxalate stones. A deficiency of vitamin B6 increases the amount of oxalate in the urine, and some research has shown that those with a high intake of B6 are at a lower risk of stone formation.
A daily therapeutic does of 100 to 150 mg of vitamin B6, preferably, combined with other B complex vitamins, should be continued for several months for getting a permanent cure.

Vitamin C and kidney stones

There has not been reliable data to show that vitamin C has a clear relationship with kidney stone formation in the human body. This is in spite of the fact that excess vitamin C in the blood does break down to oxalic acid and is eliminated through the kidneys.

Ascorbic acid (vitamin C) may convert to oxalates, and people with hyperoxaluria should avoid vitamin C supplements. A high intake of vitamin C does not appear to increase the risk of stone formation in people with no risk factors for stones.

Excess Vitamin D increases risk of kidney stones

Toxic levels of vitamin D can cause abnormally high blood calcium levels. This can result in bone loss and kidney stones. Long-term overconsumption of vitamin D can cause calcification of organs such as the heart, blood vessels, and the kidneys.

Too much Vitamin D might also increase our risk of a heart attack or kidney stones.

Supplements for kidney stones treatment

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Vitamin B6 (Pyridoxine) deficiency

Vitamin B6 (Pyridoxine) is unusual as a B vitamin in that it is so extensively stored in muscle tissue.

Why we need Vitamin B6

We need Pyridoxine for protein and fat metabolism, hormone function (estrogen and testosterone), and the production of red blood cells, niacin, and neurotransmitters (serotonin, dopamine, and norepinephrine).

In other words we need pyridoxine to turn the proteins we eat into the proteins our body needs. We need it to convert carbohydrates from the form we store them in into the form which can be used for energy.

Pyridoxine play a lot of different roles in your body, but the first place a deficiency shows up is usually your immune system—you get sick more.

Vitamin B6 deficiency

Deficiency of Pyridoxine is uncommon. If you’re low on pyridoxine, you’re probably also low on the other B’s, usually from poor diet.
Alcoholics are at risk of Vitamin B6 deficiency. Also at risk are pregnant or breastfeeding women; strict vegetarian or vegan and smokers.

Vitamin B6 deficiency causes depression and confusion, and, in extreme deficiency, brain wave abnormalities and convulsions.

Pyridoxine deficiency symptoms are nervousness, eczma, insomnia, irritability, migraine.

Natural sources of Pyridoxine

The best source of pyridoxine in your food is high-quality protein: chicken, pork, beef, fish, milk, dairy products, and eggs. Milk, dairy products, and eggs have less pyridoxine than fish and other meats, but they’re still good sources. Also, pyridoxine is added to flour, corn meal, breakfast cereals, and many baked goods.

Vitamin B6 is easily destroy by heat and can be leached out by cooking water.





Deficiency of vitamins B complex

There are eight water soluble vitamins in vitamin B group and four related substances, each of which plays an important role: thiamine (B1), riboflavin (B2), niacin (B3), pyridoxine (B6), folic acid (B9), cyanocobalamin (B12) pantothenic acid and biotin.

We need vitamins of B complex for support and increase the rate of metabolism; maintain healthy skin and muscle tone; enhance immune and nervous system function; promote cell growth and division—including that of the red blood cells that help prevent anemia; reduce the risk of pancreatic cancer, one of the most lethal forms of cancer

When you have plenty of all the vitamin B’s in your body, they work together to keep your body running efficiently, producing the energy.
If you’re low on any one B vitamin, the others can’t do their jobs.

Causes of Vitamin B deficiency

The B vitamins work so closely together that it is hard to tell which individual B vitamin is missing when a deficiency occurs.

Millions of people suffer from a deficiency of vitamin B for several reasons, major among which are:

  • Stress
  • Poor immune function.
  • Chronic digestive problems.
  • Alcohol
    As alcohol blocks ability to absorb B vitamins
  • Smoking
    Tobacco smoke decreases absorption of B vitamins across the board.
  • Oral contraception reduces levels of vitamin B.
  • Vegetarians and vegans
    who don’t eat any animal foods such as milk or eggs
  • Toxins and  poisons in the environment and personal care products deplete vitamin B complex

Vitamin B deficiency symptoms

Symptoms sited below can be link with vitamin B deficiency:

  • mental problems
  • heart palpitation
  • heart arrythmia
  • fibrillation
  • indigestion
  • chronic fatigue
  • chronic exhaustion
  • vague fears
  • fear that something dreadful is about to happen,nervousness
  • ADD (attention deficiency), inability to concentrate, irritability
  • feeling of uneasiness
  • inomnia
  • restlessness
  • tingling in hands
  • tingling fingers and toes
  • rashes
  • crying spells, inability to cope

and so much more.

How to avoid vitamin B deficiency

The best way to avoid a deficiency of B vitamins is to eat a varied diet of fresh fruit, an abundance of vegetables, whole grains, legumes, nuts and seeds, and other food as desired. Some of these B vitamins can also be made by friendly bacteria in a healthy colon and absorbed into circulation.

Natural sources B vitamins are unprocessed foods.
Processing, as with sugar and white flour, tends to significantly reduce B vitamin content.
B vitamins are particularly concentrated in meat and meat products such as liver, turkey, and tuna.
Other good sources for B vitamins are potatoes, bananas, lentils, chile peppers, tempeh, beans, nutritional yeast, brewer’s yeast, and molasses.


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