Vitamin D absorption

Milk

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According to new study consumption your vitamin D supplement with the largest meal of the day may boost its absorption substantially.

What does vitamin d do

Vitamin D is an important vitamin that not only regulates calcium, but also has many other beneficial actions.

Vitamin D may protect against heart disease and some types of cancer. Vitamin D may also have some role in regulating the immune system and also reducing blood sugar levels in patients with diabetes. Proper vitamin D levels are needed to prevent osteoporosis. In conclusion, proper vitamin D levels are essential for one’s health, especially if you have thyroid problems. Unless a patient is exposed to sunlight or foods containing vitamin D, screening for Vitamin D deficiency is recommended for all thyroid patients. So it is important is vitamin D absorption factor.

Take Vitamin D with largest meal

Absorption increases by 50% when Vitamin D is taken with biggest meal.

Trials in Cleveland Clinic studied 17 men and women, average age 64, whose blood levels of vitamin D were borderline insufficient despite taking supplements, to take their supplements with the largest meal of the day.

After two or three months, the study participants had about a 50% increase in blood levels of the vitamin, regardless of the dose they took.

Researchers Guy B. Mulligan, MD, and Angelo Licata, MD, had noticed that patients in general take the supplement either on an empty stomach or with a light meal.

Because the vitamin D is fat-soluble, the researchers conjectured that taking it with a big meal would improve absorption.

Vitamin D is essential not only to keep bone strength, but studies now suggests it plays a role in immune system problems, cancer, and cardiovascular disease.

The researchers measured blood levels of the vitamin in begin of the study and two or three months later. Participants took a range of doses, and the researchers divided them into three groups: less than 50,000 IU a week, 50,000 IU, and more than 50,000 IU. The daily doses varied from 1,000 IU to 50,000 IU.

A dose of 400 IU is termed adequate for people 51-70, and 600 IU for people 71 and older, as set by the Institute of Medicine, but some researchers believe much more is needed, especially in older adults. The current upper tolerable level is set at 2,000 IU daily. The recommendations are under review and an update is expected very soon.

At the study start, the average blood level of the form of vitamin D measured, 25(OH)D, was 30.5 nanograms per milliliter. By the end, it was 47.2 ng/mL. A level of 15 and higher is termed adequate by the Institute of Medicine for healthy people, but the study participants had a range of health problems, such as osteoporosis and thyroid problems.

Sources of Vitamin D

Few foods contain vitamin D naturally, and some foods are fortified with it. Vitamin D synthesis is also triggered when the body is exposed to sunlight.
Vitamin D is really two different compounds, cholecalciferol (vitamin D2), found mainly in plants and ergocalciferol (vitamin D3), found mainly in animals. Both of these hormones are collectively referred to as vitamin D, and they can either be obtained in two ways. One is by exposure of the skin to the ultraviolet (UV) rays of sunlight or also from dietary intake.
Vitamin D is found naturally in fish (such as salmon and sardines) and fish oils, eggs and cod liver oil. However most Vitamin D is obtained from foods fortified with Vitamin D, especially milk and orange juice. Interestingly, as breast feeding has become more popular, the incidence of Vitamin D deficiency has increased as less fortified milk is consumed.

Vitamin D deficiency may also occur in patients with malabsorption from their intestine, such as in the autoimmune disease called Celiac Disease, which occurs frequently in patients with thyroid problems. Multivitamins also contain Vitamin D, as does some calcium supplements like Oscal-D and Citracal plus D.

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H1N1 flu linked to Vitamin D deficiency

A recent University of Colorado study, of 18,000 people, shows those with higher levels of vitamin D appear to be better protected against the (Swine Flu) and seasonal flu.

Vitamin D deficiency is a widespread and common problem that causes chronic conditions, debilitating diseases and, in some cases, death. Over one million people die each year from vitamin D deficiency most likely due to not getting enough sun exposure because of skin cancer fears. The irony is that Vitamin D actually prevents cancer and other diseases including the swine flu.

The groups most affected by the H1N1 swine flu virus have been those most likely to be vitamin D deficient: pregnant women, obese people, those with Type II diabetes and children with neurological disorders.

Research on the Vitamin’s flu-prevention benefits have been around for the past 30 years. It was back in 1981 that R Edgar Hope Simpson first proposed that a principal cause of seasonal influenza is linked with the deficiency of solar radiation which triggers the production of vitamin D in the skin. Much of this hypothesis is based on the notion that Vitamin D deficiency is most commonly seen during the winter months when sunlight is at a premium.

Doctors recommend taking Vitamin D regularly to boost your immune system during winter season. Vitamin D is produced in the body during exposure to sunlight. During the winter we tend to get less exposure to sunlight.

People who take vitamin D supplements have better luck avoiding the seasonal flu; there is no reason to think that it won’t do the same for H1N1 virus. Flu outbreaks tend to occur in places where solar radiation is low.

Many doctors are beginning to recommend a daily supplement of vitamin D of anywhere from 2,000 to 10,000 IU of vitamin D3 daily, especially in the winter.


Vitamins and minerals for Prostate Health

There are a number of prostate vitamins, minerals and natural herbs and that may be a real help in promoting the health and functioning of the prostate and urinary tract in men.
Having enough RDA vitamin C, Vitamin D, vitamin E, selenium and zinc in you diet you considerably reduce risk of prostate diseases: prostatitis, BPH (benign prostatic hyperplasia) and even prostate cancer.
ARG's DIM Palmetto Prostate Formula 60Sg

Vitamin E

Current research shows that vitamin E appears to reduce the risk of prostate cancer. Some experts recommend using the gamma-tocopherol form of vitamin E.

Vitamin D

Vitamin D may also fight with prostate cancer. Vitamin D is known to inhibit prostate cancer in animals. As such, vitamin D appears to be important in preventing prostate cancer even though human research remains unclear. In addition, vitamin D is being studied as an agent for the treatment of prostate cancer. Recommended daily allowance of vitamin D in your diet must be equal:
*For men ages 19 to 50: 200 IU a day.
*For men ages 51 to 70: 400 IU a day.
*For men ages 71 and older: 600 IU a day.

Vitamin C

Vitamin C has been used to aid healing and to promote prostate health.

Zinc

Deficiency of zinc in diet has been linked to BPH, prostatitis, and even prostate cancer. Zinc is used to promote prostate health and some experts do recommend zinc for BPH. In addition, zinc may even shrink an enlarged prostate.

Selenium

Selenium harbors antioxidant properties that are thought to work with vitamin E to provide extra protection from toxin damage linked to prostatitis. Selenium also is able to slow prostate growth as well as help prevent prostate cancer.
Ask a doctor before taking any vitamin and mineral supplementsOnline Medical Advice

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