H1N1 flu linked to Vitamin D deficiency

A recent University of Colorado study, of 18,000 people, shows those with higher levels of vitamin D appear to be better protected against the (Swine Flu) and seasonal flu.

Vitamin D deficiency is a widespread and common problem that causes chronic conditions, debilitating diseases and, in some cases, death. Over one million people die each year from vitamin D deficiency most likely due to not getting enough sun exposure because of skin cancer fears. The irony is that Vitamin D actually prevents cancer and other diseases including the swine flu.

The groups most affected by the H1N1 swine flu virus have been those most likely to be vitamin D deficient: pregnant women, obese people, those with Type II diabetes and children with neurological disorders.

Research on the Vitamin’s flu-prevention benefits have been around for the past 30 years. It was back in 1981 that R Edgar Hope Simpson first proposed that a principal cause of seasonal influenza is linked with the deficiency of solar radiation which triggers the production of vitamin D in the skin. Much of this hypothesis is based on the notion that Vitamin D deficiency is most commonly seen during the winter months when sunlight is at a premium.

Doctors recommend taking Vitamin D regularly to boost your immune system during winter season. Vitamin D is produced in the body during exposure to sunlight. During the winter we tend to get less exposure to sunlight.

People who take vitamin D supplements have better luck avoiding the seasonal flu; there is no reason to think that it won’t do the same for H1N1 virus. Flu outbreaks tend to occur in places where solar radiation is low.

Many doctors are beginning to recommend a daily supplement of vitamin D of anywhere from 2,000 to 10,000 IU of vitamin D3 daily, especially in the winter.


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